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Precode Horror

Category:  Horror
Owner:  GAM
Last Modified:  4/10/2021
Set Description
Precode Horror Comics

Set Goals
Ultimate stretch goal is to assemble a collection of all precode horror comics as itemized in the appendix of Greg Sadowski and John Benson's book "Four Color Fear". 1,371 books, ordered by publisher and title, are as follows:

ACE Publications (97 Issues)
Baffling Mysteries 5 to 24 (Nov. 1951 - Jan. 1955)
The Beyond 1 to 30 (Nov. 1950 - Jan. 1955)
Challenge of the Unknown 6 (Sep. 1950)
Hand of Fate 8 to 25(2) (Dec. 1951 - Mar. 1955)
Web of Mystery 1 to 27 (Feb. 1951 - Nov. 1954)

AMERICAN COMICS GROUP (119 Issues)
Adventures into the Unknown 1 to 61 (Fall 1948 - Jan.-Feb. 1955)
The Clutching Hand 1 (July - Aug. 1954)
Forbidden Worlds 1 to 34 (July-Aug. 1951 - Oct.-Nov. 1954)
Out of the Night 1 to 17 (Feb. - Mar. 1952 - Oct.-Nov. 1954)
Skeleton Hand 1 to 6 (Sep.-Oct. 1952 - July-Aug. 1953)

AJAX-FARRELL (62 Issues)
Fantastic Fears 7, 8, 3 to 9 (May 1953 - Sep.-Oct. 1954)
Fantastic 10, 11 (Nov.-Dec. 1954 - Jan.-Feb. 1955)
Haunted Thrills 1 to 18 (June 1952 - Nov.-Dec. 1954)
Strange Fantasy 2(1), 2 to 14 (Aug. 1952 - Oct.-Nov. 1954)
Voodoo 1 to 18 (May 1952 - Nov.-Dec. 1954)
Voodoo Annual 1 (1952)

ATLAS (389 Issues)
Adventures into Terror 43,44, 3 to 31 (Nov. 1950 - May 1954)
Adventures into Weird Worlds 1 to 30 (Jan. 1952 - June 1954)
Amazing Detective Cases 11 to 14 (Mar. 1952 - Sep. 1952)
Amazing Mysteries 32,33 (May 1949 - July 1949)
Astonishing 6 to 37 (Oct. 1951 - Feb. 1955)
Captain America's Weird Tales 74,75 (Oct. 1949 - Feb. 1950)
Journey into Mystery 1 to 22 (June 1952 - Feb. 1955)
Journey into Unknown Worlds 4 to 33 (Apr. 1951 - Feb. 1955)
Marvel Tales 93 to 131 (Aug. 1949 - Feb. 1955)
Menace 1 to 11 (Mar. 1953 - May 1954)
Men's Adventures 21 to 26 May 1953 - Mar. 1954)
Mystery Tales 1 to 26 (Mar. 1952 - Feb. 1955)
Mystic 1 to 36 (Mar 1951 - Mar. 1955)
Spellbound 1 to 23 (Mar. 1952 - June 1954)
Strange Tales 1 to 34 (June 1951 - Feb. 1955)
Suspense 3 to 29 (May 1950 - Apr. 1953)
Uncanny Tales 1 to 28 (June 1952 - Jan. 1955)
Venus 14 to 19 (June 1951 - Apr. 1952)

AVON (30 Issues)
City of the Living Dead nn (1952)
The Dead Who Walk nn (1952)
Diary of Horror 1 (Dec. 1952)
Eerie 1 (Jan. 1947)
Eerie 1 to 17 (May 1951 - Aug.-Sep. 1954)
Night of Mystery nn (1953)
Phantom Witch Doctor 1 (1952)
Secret Diary of Eerie Adventures nn (1953)
Witchcraft 1 to 6 (Mar. 1952 - Mar. 1953)

CHARLTON (32 Issues)
Strange Suspense Stories 16 to 22 (Jan.-Feb. 1954 - Nov. 1954)
The Thing 1 to 17 (Feb. 1952 - Nov. 1954)
This is Suspense 23 (Feb. 1955)
This Magazine is Haunted 15 to 21 (Mar. 1954 - Nov. 1954)

COMIC MEDIA
Horrific 1 to 13 (Sep. 1952 - Sep. 1954)
Terrific 14 (Dec. 1954)
Weird Terror 1 to 13 (Sep. 1952 - Sep. 1954)

DS/PL (3 Issues)
Weird Adventures 1 to 3 (May-June 1951 - Sep.-Oct. 1951)

EC (91 Issues)
Crypt of Terror 17 to 19 (Apr.-May 1950 - Aug.-Sep. 1950)
Haunt of Fear 15 to 17, 4 to 28 (May-June 1950 - Nov.-Dec. 1954)
Tales from the Crypt 20 to 46 (Oct.-Nov. 1950 - Feb.-Mar. 1955)
Tales of Terror Annual 1 to 3 (1951 - 1953)
Three-Dimensional Tales from the Crypt of Terror 3-D no. 2 (Spring 1954)
Vault of Horror 12 to 40 (Apr.-May 1950 - Dec. 1954-Jan. 1955)

FAWCETT (42 Issues)
Beware Terror Tales 1 to 8 (May 1952 - July 1953)
Strange Tales from Another World 2 to 5 (Aug. 1952 - Feb. 1953)
Strange Suspense Stories 1 to 5 (June 1952 - Feb. 1953)
This Magazine is Haunted 1 to 14 (Oct. 1951 - Dec. 1953)
Unknown World 1 (June 1952)
Worlds Beyond 1 (Nov. 1951)
Worlds of Fear 2 to 10 (Jan. 1952 - June 1953)

FICTION HOUSE (13 Issues)
Ghost Comics 1 to 11 (1951 - 1954)
The Monster 1, 2 (1953)

FOX (1 Issue)
A Star Presentation 3 (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde) (May 1950)

GILLMOR (1 Issue)
Weird Mysteries 1 to 12 (Oct. 1952 - Sep. 1954)

HARVEY (96 Issues)
Black Cat Mystery 30 to 53 (Aug. 1951 - Dec. 1954)
Chamber of Chills 21 to 24, 5 to 26 (June 1951 - Dec. 1954)
Thrills of Tomorrow 17, 18 (Oct. 1954 - Dec. 1954)
Tomb of Terror 1 to 16 (June 1952 - July 1954)
Witches Tales 1 to 28 (Jan. 1951 - Dec. 1954)

HILLMAN (1 Issue)
Monster Crime Comics 1 (Oct. 1952)

KEY (3 Issues)
Weird Chills 1 to 3 (July 1954 - Nov. 1954)

MASTER (22 Issues)
Dark Mysteries 1 to 22 (June 1951 - Mar. 1955)

PREMIER (2 Issues)
Horror from the Tomb 1 (Sept. 1954)
Mysterious Stories 2 (Dec. 1954)

PRIZE (53 Issues)
Black Magic 1 to 33 (Oct.-Nov. 1950 - Nov.-Dec. 1954)
Frankenstein 18 to 33 (Mar. 1952 - Oct.-Nov. 1954)
Strange World of Your Dreams 1 to 4 (Aug. 1952 - Jan.-Feb. 1953)

QUALITY (22 Issues)
Intrigue 1 (Jan. 1955)
Web of Evil 1 to 21 (Nov. 1952 - Dec. 1954)

STANDARD (31 Issues)
Adventures into Darkness 5 to 14 (Aug. 1952 - June 1954)
Out of the Shadows 5 to 14 (July 1952 - Aug. 1954)
The Unseen 5 to 15 (1952 - July 1954)

STANLEY MORSE (27 Issues)
Mister Mystery 1 to 19 (Sep. 1951 - Oct. 1954)
Weird Tales of the Future 1 to 8 (Mar. 1952 - July 1953)

STAR (36 Issues)
Blue Bolt Weird Tales 111 to 119 (Nov. 1951 - May-June 1953)
Ghostly Weird Stories 120 to 124 (Sep. 1953 - Sep. 1954)
Spook 22 to 30 (Jan. 1953 - Oct. 1954)
Startling Terror Tales 10 to 14, 4 to 11 (May 1952 - Nov. 1954)

STERLING (2 Issues)
The Tormented 1,2 (July 1954 - Sep. 1954)

STORY (36 Issues)
Fight Against Crime 9 to 21 (Sep. 1952 - Sep. 1954)
Mysterious Adventures 1 to 23 (Mar. 1951 - Dec. 1954)

ST. JOHN (25 Issues)
Amazing Ghost Stories 14 to 16 (Oct. 1954 - Feb. 1955)
House of Terror 1 (Oct. 1953)
Nightmare 3, 10 to 13 (Oct. 1953 - Aug. 1954)
Strange Terrors 1 to 7 (June 1952 - Mar. 1953)
Weird Horrors 1 to 9 (June 1952 - Oct. 1953)

SUPERIOR (53 Issues)
Journey into Fear 1 to 21 (May 1951 - Sep. 1954)
Mysteries (Weird and Strange) 1 to 11 (May 1953 - Jan. 1955)
Strange Mysteries 1 to 21 (Sep. 1951 - Jan. 1955)

TOBY (14 Issues)
Tales of Horror 1 to 13 (June 1952 - Oct. 1954)
Tales of Terror 1 (1952)

YOUTHFUL/TROJAN (22 Issues)
Beware 10 to 16, 5 to 14 (June 1952 - Mar. 1955)
Chilling Tales 13 to 17 (Dec. 1952 - Oct. 1953)

ZIFF-DAVIS (8 Issues)
Eerie Adventures 1 (Winter 1951)
Nightmare 1,2 (Summer 1952 - Fall 1952)
Weird Thrillers 1 to 5 (Sep. 1951 - Oct.-Nov. 1952)

Slot Name
Item Description
Grade
Owner Comments
Pics
ACE, 4/1954 Baffling Mysteries 20 8.0 Baffling Mysteries #20’s cover art, drawn by Lou Cameron, is recognized by Overstreet as a Classic Cover. While Cameron’s cover art depicts an enticing scene of a beautiful women being bound by green pygmies in search of their lost jewel, the interior work contains no such story linkage. The closest match is the last story in the book entitled “When Voodoo Drums Rumble”. It tells the story of Stefan Hootner and the consequences he faces as a result of his disrespect for native customers and beliefs. Suffice it to say that it doesn’t turn out well for Mr. Hootner. View Comic
ACE, 1/1955 Baffling Mysteries 24 Universal 4.5 Baffling Mysteries #24 is the last pre-code issue in the series. The opening story, “The Sacred Fingers of Princess Thais”, is original to this issue but all the other full-length stories are reprints from other ACE Magazine publications. None of the stories tie back to the cover art. View Comic
Youthful/Trojan, 10/1952 Beware 12 Universal 8.5 Beware #12, published by Youthful Magazines, is referenced in Fredric Wertham’s “Seduction of the Innocent” (SOTI) in the text on page 388. On page 388, Wertham itemizes comic book storylines and images that he finds troubling and describes one such story as follows “In one comic book ‘the top horror artist in the entire comic book field’ is confined in the ‘state home for mental defectives’ where his little son goes to visit him. Dialogue at the gate between the guard and the boy: Guard: ‘Yes, I know it’s visiting day. But he’s still too violent.’ Little boy: ‘I-I-just wanted to tell him he’s won the ‘ghoul’ for the most horrible comic book script of the year.’”This example is taken from the story “My Daddy Should Have Listened” contained in Beware #12. The story tells the tale of a comic book artist and writer, aptly writing for Beware Comics, that runs out of ideas and turns to his son and his new found playmate “Willie” for storylines. He gets more than he bargains for when he pays a visit to Willie and finds that his monsters are not imaginative but real! I have included a scan of the page that contains the dialogue described by Wertham. View Comic
ACE, 1/1953 Beyond 18 Universal 4.5 Beyond #18 is referenced in Geoffrey Wagner’s “Parade of Pleasure” (POP) in the text on pages 81-82.

Wagner describes Beyond #18 as follows “These crime-terror booklets, seemingly on the increase, show a monstrous reiteration of the morbid, of tombs, electric chairs, mortuaries, surgeries, and so forth. Take The BEYOND no 18: its first story tells of a girl who tries to murder her husband, only to find him turn into a phoenix which finally burns her in its embrace… The second is a welter of murders committed by a ‘ghost’. The third concerns a man who finds a severed hand in a Ming dynasty box. This hand steals his girl-friend in a fine scene and eventually strangles the man himself while he is in a strait-jacket in a lunatic asylum… The fourth story starts off with a man dying in the electric chair, but he proves unkillable and returns to life to run a gang of crooks in a city where the police are powerless to stop him with mere bullets. In the end his body decays, rather contradictorily, and ‘Jules Scholler dragged his rotting body to the dump. There, amidst the burning garbage, he committed his tortured soul to the flames.’

As described by Wagner, I have included a scan of the panel of Jules Scholler committing his rotting body to the dump.
View Comic
ACE, 7/1954 Beyond 27 Universal 6.0 The Beyond #27 is referenced in Fredric Wertham’s “Seduction of the Innocent” (SOTI) in the text on page 111.

Wertham offers a story from The Beyond #27 as an example of extreme violence in the comics of the 1950s. He describes a passage as follows “In many comics stories there is nothing but violence. It is violence for violence’s sake. The plot: killing. The motive: to kill. The characterization: killer. The end: killed. In one comic book the scientist (‘mad,’ of course), Dr. Simon Lorch, after experimenting on himself with an elixir, has the instinct to ‘kill and kill again.’ He ‘flails’ to death two young men whom he sees changing a tire on the road. He murders two boys he finds out camping. And so on for a week. Finally he is killed himself.”

Wertham is clearly describing the story “Strange Potion of Dr. Lorch” from The Beyond #27. I have included a scan of the page where a bestial Dr. Lorch flails to death two young men changing a tire as described by Wertham on page 111.
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Harvey, 6/1952 Black Cat Mystery Comics 36 Universal 7.5 Black Cat Mystery Comics #36 is referenced in the text of the “Seduction of the Innocent” (SOTI) on pages 270-271. In this section of the SOTI, the author Fredric Wertham provides his analysis on why parents don’t take steps to stop their children from reading comic books. Wertham attributes the inaction to a feeling of “helplessness” by parents particularly mothers. He describes how mothers that raise their voice in objection to comics are attacked by experts for the defense (i.e. comic book publishers) that use “pseudo-Freudian lore” to explain why comic book reading is healthy for children.Wertham goes on to describe how a fictitious mother (Mrs. Jones) would feel reading Black Cat Mystery Comics #36 to her child Bobby (the comic is not identified directly but can be discerned from the descriptions of the stories and art). In this fictitious reading, the mother selects a comic that appeals to her because it has a full page add showing “forty-four smiling and happy children’s faces”. Upon selecting this comic she is distressed to find that the cover starts with “The Battle of Monsters!” and depicts “an enormous bestial colored human being who is brandishing a club and carrying off a scared blonde little boy in knee pants”. She goes on to read the first story filled with anxiety provoking language: “Look!! Their bodies are crumbling away!!”, “Kill! K-AARGHH!”, “YAIEE-E-E”. Skipping this story the mother begins another entitled “Whip of Death” where a young boy is tied to a mast and whipped to death by a captain. Wertham goes on to describe how the mother gives up reading the comic and decides that if the child-psychiatry and child-guidance expert say: “Bobby needs this to get rid of his aggressions he has to go through with it alone. She can’t take it.” Wertham sums up this section of the book with a simile that reading a comic book violates a child’s mind in a way similar to how a sexual assault violates a young girl - pretty strong stuff even for Wertham. In closing, to help you experience the trauma this comic inflicted on Bobby and his mom, I have include a scan of the front cover and the first page of the monster story. Prepare to be violated… View Comic
Harvey, 9/1952 Black Cat Mystery Comics 39 Universal 8.0 Black Cat Mystery #39 is referenced in Fredric Wertham’s “Seduction of the Innocent” (SOTI) on pages 386-388. The reference is contained in chapter XIV of the SOTI and this chapter, entitled “The Triumph of Dr. Payn”, takes its name from a character in a story from Black Cat Mystery #39. Wertham begins the chapter with a detailed description of the story “The Body Maker” from Black Cat Mystery #39. The story details the exploits of Dr. Payn, a Frankenstein monster inspired individual, as he goes about murdering and collecting the body parts of beautiful women. After describing the story, Wertham goes on to point out that this gruesome tale is clearly addressed to children by quoting from the letters page of the comic “I enjoy your books very much and read them in bed at night before I go to sleep. I am eleven years old.” Of the many examples that Wertham uses throughout the SOTI, I found “The Body Maker” to be perhaps his best example of a story that is not suited for young children. The story is well crafted but quite graphic in its lust-murder imagery. Although, as he is apt to do, Wertham is error prone is his description of the story. For example, he describes the opening scene as follows “When you first meet Dr. Payn, he is in his laboratory wearing a white coat. On a couch before him lies a blond young woman with conspicuous breasts, bare legs and the lower part of her skirt frazzled and in tatters, as if she had been roughly handled in strenuous but unsuccessful attempts to defend her honor.” I have included a scan of the opening page of the story. I think Wertham missed the point that the woman looks roughly handled not from defending her honor but because she’s been sewn together in a Frankenstein monster like way. In addition to “The Body Maker” another story, “The Witch Killer”, from Black Cat Mystery #39 is referenced on pages 387-388. Wertham quotes a passage from the story to provide an additional example of the age inappropriate material contained in comic books “A young solider ‘keeping watch in his foxhole in Korea’ is exterminated by a ghost: ‘The fangs and talons of the evil witch sank deeper into his jugular vein and then came out, withdrawing rich red blood. The young man sank forward, face up, dead!” View Comic
Harvey, 10/1954 Black Cat Mystery Comics 52 Universal 6.5 Black Cat Mystery #52 reprints stories originally contained in Black Cat Mystery #34. The reprinted stories are: Jack of Horror, Shadows of the Tomb, Hand of the Yogi and Halloween Nightmare. Of the four stories, I rate Halloween Nightmare the highest as I found the scavenger hunt story element entertaining. View Comic
Prize, 4-5/1951 Black Magic 4 Universal 7.0 Black Magic #4, published in April-May 1951, contains 5 pre-code horror stories:

“Voodoo on Tenth Avenue” is the cover story for the issue and tells the story of a woman who seeks revenue on an aging magic partner through a voodoo doll only to learn that voodoo cuts both ways.

“Hideout!”: A detective uncovers a criminal, Bully Brown, who has used black magic to switch bodies with another to avoid being killed by the police. The detective ultimately convinces Ma Foster, the purveyor of the evil magic, to reverse her spell and send Bully to the grave with his body and return the spirit of the other man back to his natural body and loving wife.

“A Man’s Last Dream!”: A man tests the lines between dreams and ghosts.

“The Dead Don’t Really Die!”: A man sees and hears the man he murdered in the everyday people and places of his life.

“The Jonah! Curse of the Seven Seas!”: A hexed sailor tells his story.
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Prize, 5/1953 Black Magic 24 Universal 6.5 Black Magic #24 is featured on a poster board prop used in the 1954 U.S. Senate subcommittee hearings exploring the link between comics and juvenile delinquency.

The poster board, displaying 24 comics of the “Crime, Horror & Weird Variety”, appears in a picture with Senator Robert C. Hendrickson (Chairman of the Senate subcommittee). Standing alongside Senator Hendrickson is New York State Assemblyman James A. Fitzpatrick. Fitzpatrick chaired a similar juvenile delinquency subcommittee of the New York State Legislature. The cover of Black Magic #24 is located on the poster board at row 2, 3rd in from the left.
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Prize, 3-4/1954 Black Magic 29 Universal 5.0 In 1954 and 1955 the U.S. Senate convened hearings and issued a report on comic books and juvenile delinquency. Noteworthy participants in the hearings included Fredric Wertham, author of the book “Seduction of the Innocent” and William Gaines, publisher of EC Comics.

Black Magic V4#5 (#29) is cited by Richard Clendenen, Executive Director of the U.S. Senate Subcommittee investigating juvenile delinquency. Clendenen references Black Magic #29 during his testimony to the Senate Subcommittee on Wednesday, April 21, 1954 and describes the comic as follows “The first such comic is ‘Black Magic’. This is a picture showing the cover or title page of this comic. Now, one story in this comic is entitled ‘Sanctuary’, and the cover shots relate to this particular story. You will note that this shot shows certain inhabitants of this sanctuary which is really a sort of sanitarium for freaks where freaks can be isolated from other persons in society. You will note 1 man in the picture has 2 heads and 4 arms, another body extends only to the bottom of his rib. But the greatest horror of all the freaks in the sanctuary is the attractive looking girl in the center of the picture who disguises her grotesque body in a suit of foam rubber. The final picture shows a young doctor in the sanitarium as he sees the girl he loves without her disguise. The story closes as the doctor fires bullet after bullet into the girl’s misshapen body”.

While Clendenen refers to the story as “Sanctuary” the actual story title is “The Greatest Horror of Them All!”
View Comic
Star, 12/1952 Blue Bolt 116 Universal 4.5 Blue Bolt Weird Tales #116 opens up with a horror story by Jay Disbrow that tells the story of Corporal Willy Jacks and his encounter with the Ghostly Guardians of the Korean War. Willy, on patrol with his platoon, comes under intense enemy fire. Soon all of Willy’s comrades are killed and Willy himself is rendered unconscious. Willy awakens hours later and begins to make his way back across enemy lines. Along the way, he learns of an imminent attack by the Red army and is gravely wounded trying to warn the Marines of the surprise attack. He is about to give up when a group of ghostly figures visits him while he lays wounded on the battle field. They tell Willy that they are soldiers that have given their life in the pursuit of freedom and that he must do the same to save a Marine regiment from certain death. Willy, inspired by the Ghostly Guardians, rallies his courage and detonates a grenade that ends his life but warns the Marines of the pending attack. The story ends with Willy learning that, through his sacrifice, his spirit will now be accepted into the hallowed ranks of the Ghostly Guardians. View Comic
Star, 2/1953 Blue Bolt 117 Universal 6.0 View Comic
Star, 4/1953 Blue Bolt 118 Universal 4.5 Jay Disbrow’s “The Creature in the Ferns” cover story introduces Tagona the Titan and Zafara Zaran in a epic battle that stretches over millennia and a swamp or two. View Comic
Harvey:Chamber of Chills Chamber of Chills 7 9.0 Chamber of Chills #7 is referenced in Fredric Wertham’s “Seduction of the Innocent” (SOTI) in the text on page 389. On page 389, Wertham provides a narrative on comic book murder as follows “The stories of murder go from the simple through the gruesome to the weird. One man kills his wife with a poker, another shoots a wolf which is his wife, a third becomes transformed into a huge crab and eats her.” The crab reference comes from the story “Crawling Death” contained in Chamber of Chills #7. I have included a scan of the page from the story that shows the man being transformed into a crab and dining on his wife. View Comic
Ziff-Davis:Eerie Adventures Eerie Adventures 1 Universal 6.5 Eerie Adventures #1 is referenced in Fredric Wertham’s “Seduction of the Innocent” (SOTI) on pages 316-317. In this section of the SOTI, Wertham is lamenting the legal protections that comic book publishers enjoy and the resistance society has to passing new laws to protect children from the harmful effects of comic books. He references Eerie Adventures #1 to underscore his point as noted below: “Although in many children’s lives comic books play a role, no adult court, no children’s court, has ever made or ordered a full inquiry in a child’s case. But when the publishers of the comic book Eerie sued the publisher of the comic book Eerie Adventures for using the word eerie on the cover, the New York Supreme Court gave a learned and comprehensive opinion bristling with details and citations: Justice Frank arrived at the truly Solomonic verdict that both publishers could use the word; but that the second publisher must print it ‘reduced in size.’ If the psychological effects on children would receive the same meticulous concern as the financial interests of publishers, some court would have long since ordered that what has to be ‘reduced’ is not the eerie title but the eerie contents!” View Comic
Ajax-Farrell:Fantastic Fears Fantastic Fears 6 Universal 5.5 In 1949 the State of New York formed a legislative committee to study the publication of comics. The committee issued a series of reports beginning in 1950 and carrying through 1957. The 1951 report and the 1954 report contained illustrative sections depicting comics that the committee found objectionable.

The cover of Fantastic Fears #6 is contained in Appendix A of the 1954 report. Page 16 of the report describes Appendix A as containing examples of covers “depicting sex, terror, crime and brutality”. In addition to appearing in the 1954 report, the cover of Fantastic Fears #6 is considered a classic by the Overstreet Guide.
View Comic
Story:Fight Against Crime Fight Against Crime 15 4.5 Fight Against Crime #15 is depicted in Geoffrey Wagner’s “Parade of Pleasure” (POP) as both black & white, and color illustrations.

An interior page of POP contains a black and white illustration of the cover of Fight Against Crime #15. The black & white illustration appears alongside other comic covers with the caption “Crime and politics go side by side in some typical crime and superman-comics”.

The color illustration of the cover of Fight Against Crime #15 is located on the POP dust jacket. Its located in the 2nd row of comics 3rd in from the left.
View Comic
Star:Ghostly Weird Stories Ghostly Weird Stories 123 Universal 4.0 Blue Bolt Ghostly Weird Stories #123 mostly reprints material from Jo-Jo comics and previous issues of Blue Bolt with the exception of the opening cover story “The Thing from the Void” by Jay Disbrow. It’s a solid horror story with a science fiction twist thrown in for good measure. View Comic
ACE:Hand of Fate Hand of Fate 8 Universal 4.0 Hand of Fate #8 is the first issue in the Hand of Fate series. Before converting to Hand of Fate this comic was formerly titled “Men Against Crime”. The book has four main feature stories: “The Revolt of the Heads”, “Canyon of the Living Dead”, “Death Howls by Moonrise”, and “Monster of the Bayous”. None the feature stories tie back to the cover art. View Comic
ACE:Hand of Fate Hand of Fate 18 Universal 6.5 Hand of Fate #18 is featured on a poster board prop used in the 1954 U.S. Senate subcommittee hearings exploring the link between comics and juvenile delinquency.

The poster board, displaying 24 comics of the “Crime, Horror & Weird Variety”, appears in a picture with Senator Robert C. Hendrickson (Chairman of the Senate subcommittee). Standing alongside Senator Hendrickson is New York State Assemblyman James A. Fitzpatrick. Fitzpatrick chaired a similar juvenile delinquency subcommittee of the New York State Legislature. The cover of Hand of Fate #18 is located on the poster board at row 2, 5th in from the left.
View Comic
Ace, 12/53 Hand of Fate 21 Universal 4.0 Hand of Fate #21 is featured on a poster board prop used in the 1954 U.S. Senate subcommittee hearings exploring the link between comics and juvenile delinquency.

The poster board, displaying 24 comics of the “Crime, Horror & Weird Variety”, appears in a picture with Senator Robert C. Hendrickson (Chairman of the Senate subcommittee). Standing alongside Senator Hendrickson is New York State Assemblyman James A. Fitzpatrick. Fitzpatrick chaired a similar juvenile delinquency subcommittee of the New York State Legislature. The cover of Hand of Fate #21 is located on the poster board at row 2, 8th in from the left.
View Comic
EC:Haunt of Fear Haunt of Fear 19 6.5 Haunt of Feat #19 is referenced in Fredric Wertham’s “Seduction of the Innocent” (SOTI) as illustration #1 with the caption “A comic-book baseball game. Notice the chest protector and other details in the text and pictures.”

Illustration #1 comes from the story “Foul Play” contained in Haunt of Fear #19. It depicts a ghastly scene where baseball players are using a severed head for a ball, a torso for a chest protector and actual hands for baseball gloves. Classic horror that Wertham found to be quite objectionable.

In addition to the SOTI, Wertham also used the “Foul Play” story during his testimony to the U.S. Senate during their 1954 hearings on comic books. He described the story to the Senate as follows

“Dr. WERTHAM. Now, the question arises, and we have debated it in our group very often and very long, why does the normal child spend so much time with this smut and trash, we have this baseball game which I would like you to scrutinize in detail. They play baseball with a deadman’s head. Why do they do that?

The CHAIRMAN. Doctor, do you want to put this up here on exhibition and explain it?

Dr. WERTHAM. Yes, sir. Mr. Chairman, I can’t explain for the reason that I can’t say all the obscene things that are in this picture for little boys of 6 and 7. This is a baseball game where they play baseball with a man’s head; where the man’s intestines are baselines. All his organs have some part to play. The torso of this man is the chest protector on one of the players. There is nothing left to anybody’s morbid imagination.

Mr. BEASER. That is from a comic book?

Dr. WERTHAM. That is from a comic book. I would be glad to give you the reference later on. It is a relatively recent one.

Senator HENNINGS. Mr. Chairman, may I ask the doctor a question at this point?

The CHAIRMAN. The Senator from Missouri.

Senator HENNINGS. Doctor, I think from what you have said so far in terms of the value and effectiveness of the artists who portray these things, that it might be suggested implicitly that anyone who can draw that sort thing would have to have some very singular or peculiar abnormality or twist in his mind, or am I wrong in that?

Dr. WERTHAM. Senator, if I may go ahead in my statement, I would like to tell you that this assumption is one that we had made in the beginning and we have found it to be wrong. We have found that this enormous industry with its enormous profits has a lot of people to whom it pays money and these people have to make these drawings or else, just like the crime comic book writers have to write the stories they write, or else. There are many decent people among them. Let me tell you among the writers and the cartoonists – they don’t love me, but I know that many of them are decent people and they would much rather do something else than to what they are doing.”
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Atlas:Marvel Tales Marvel Tales 124 Universal 4.0 Marvel Tales #124 is featured on a poster board prop used in the 1954 U.S. Senate subcommittee hearings exploring the link between comics and juvenile delinquency.

The poster board, displaying 24 comics of the “Crime, Horror & Weird Variety”, appears in a picture with Senator Robert C. Hendrickson (Chairman of the Senate subcommittee). Standing alongside Senator Hendrickson is New York State Assemblyman James A. Fitzpatrick. Fitzpatrick chaired a similar juvenile delinquency subcommittee of the New York State Legislature. Marvel Tales #124 is located on the poster board at row 1, 4th in from the left.
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Comic Media:Horrific Horrific 10 Universal 4.5 In 1949 the State of New York formed a legislative committee to study the publication of comics. The committee issued a series of reports beginning in 1950 and carrying through 1957. The 1951 report and the 1954 report contained illustrative sections depicting comics that the committee found objectionable.

The cover of Horrific #10 is contained in Appendix A of the 1954 report. Page 16 of the report describes Appendix A as containing examples of covers “depicting sex, terror, crime and brutality”.
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Story:Mysterious Adventures Mysterious Adventures 11 7.0 Mysterious Adventures #11 is referenced in Fredric Wertham’s “Seduction of the Innocent” (SOTI) in the text on page 84. On page 84, Wertham describes comic book scenes that he found disturbing. One such passage reads as follows “A counterpart to the girl who dreams about murder and morphine is the equally blond girl in another comic book who muses over a cigarette: ‘I like to remember the past! It was so wonderful!’ What was ‘so wonderful?’ This girl was the young wife of a Nazi concentration-camp guard. You see him hit a half-nude prisoner with a truncheon while she says: ‘Hit him again, Franz! Make him bleed more! Hit him!’ Evidently the industry thinks that some children learn slowly, for the same scene is repeated in a close-up: ‘Hit him some more, Franz! Hit him! Make him bleed more, Franz! Make him bleed!’ And later she says: ‘I like to remember the prisoners suffering, the beatings and the blood!’”The scene that Wertham describes comes from the story “A Grave Diggers Terror!” contained in Mysterious Adventures #11. I have included a scan of the title page from this story that shows Frieda (the blond girl) urging Franz to beat the prisoner. The story unfolds as Wertham describes with the twist at the end that Frieda is a vampire and she is killed, along with her husband Franz, by the ghoul of a prisoner that was killed as a result of their beatings. View Comic
Story:Mysterious Adventures Mysterious Adventures 18 Universal 4.0 In 1954 and 1955 the U.S. Senate convened hearings and issued a report on comic books and juvenile delinquency. Noteworthy participants in the hearings included Fredric Wertham, author of the book “Seduction of the Innocent”, and William Gaines, publisher of EC Comics.

Mysterious Adventures #18 is one of the comics cited as an example of “depraved violence” in the Senate report. In particular, Mysterious Adventures #18 interior story “Bottoms Up” is used as an example of inappropriate content for children. “Bottoms Up” tells the story of an alcoholic husband and father whose neglectful actions leads to the death of his son. In rage, the wife murders the husband and puts various body parts in bottles of alcohol. The story ends with the macabre note that its not a case of the liquor being in Lou but rather Lou being in the liquor.
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ACE:Out of the Night Out of the Night 14 Universal 7.0 In 1949 the State of New York formed a legislative committee to study the publication of comics. The committee issued a series of reports beginning in 1950 and carrying through 1957. The 1951 report and the 1954 report contained illustrative sections depicting comics that the committee found objectionable.

The cover of Out of the Night #14 is contained in Appendix A of the 1954 report. Page 16 of the report describes Appendix A as containing examples of covers “depicting sex, terror, crime and brutality”.

In addition to being referenced in the 1954 New York Legislative Report, Out of the Night #14 was also featured on a poster board prop used in the 1954 U.S. Senate subcommittee hearings exploring the link between comics and juvenile delinquency.

The poster board, displaying 24 comics representative of the “Crime, Horror & Weird Variety”, appears in a picture with Senator Robert C. Hendrickson (Chairman of the Senate subcommittee). Standing alongside Senator Hendrickson is New York State Assemblyman James A. Fitzpatrick. The cover of Out of the Night #14 is located on the poster board at row 3, 1st in from the left.

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Atlas, 6/1954 Spellbound 23 Universal 6.0 Spellbound #23 is featured on a poster board prop used in the 1954 U.S. Senate subcommittee hearings exploring the link between comics and juvenile delinquency.

The poster board, displaying 24 comics of the “Crime, Horror & Weird Variety”, appears in a picture with Senator Robert C. Hendrickson (Chairman of the Senate subcommittee). Standing alongside Senator Hendrickson is New York State Assemblyman James A. Fitzpatrick. Fitzpatrick chaired a similar juvenile delinquency subcommittee of the New York State Legislature. The cover of Spellbound #23 is located on the poster board at row 3, 6 in from the left.
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Star:Spook Spook 24 Universal 7.0 Spook #24 is referenced in Fredric Wertham’s “Seduction of the Innocent” (SOTI) in the text on pages 182-183.

Wertham believed that comic books, through the depiction of masochistic sexual fantasies, contributed to sexual delinquency in children. On pages 182-183 he describes one such example “Typical masochist fantasies that could be straight out of Sacher Masoch are offered to little boys and girls by the comic-book industry. In one story a baroness has two male slaves. They ‘obey her every whim while she lorded it over them with a savage tyranny!’ The accompanying picture shows the baroness, whip in hand. She talks about forcing a man ‘to come to me on his knees’ and speaks of him as ‘my willing slave.’ In one scene which might be from a case history by Krafft-Ebing you see her whipping a man who is crouched on the floor: ‘So! You dare to kiss me, do you, you dog? Take that! And that!’”

The story referenced by Wertham was originally printed in Inside Crime #2 under the title “The Mad Baroness - Peril in Paradise” and reprinted in Spook #24 under the title “Mad Demon of the Grave”. It’s unclear what comic book Wertham used when referencing the story described on pages 182-183 so both comics are considered SOTI references.

I have included a scan of the panel that contains the Baroness whipping the “dog” that dared to kiss her.
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Star:Spook Spook 26 4.5 L.B. Cole’s cover for Spook #26 was drawn from Jay Disbrow’s interior story “Face of Death”. In addition to this story, Spook #26 contains two other Disbrow stories “Jewel of Death” and “Snow Ghost”. Other stories include Howard Larsen’s “Mystery of the Three Dials” and George Peltz’s “Invasion of Demons”. View Comic
Star:Startling Terror Tales Startling Terror Tales 4 Universal 6.0 L.B. Cole’s cover for Startling Terror Tales #4 comes from the interior story “Crime at the Carnival” drawn by George Peltz. “Crime at the Carnival” is the only original story in this issue with all the other being reprinted from previous Fox Publication crime comics (Famous Crimes #2, Spectacular Features Magazine #3, and Murder Incorporated #4). View Comic
Star:Startling Terror Tales Startling Terror Tales 9 Universal 5.5 In 1949 the State of New York formed a legislative committee to study the publication of comics. The committee issued a series of reports beginning in 1950 and carrying through 1957. The 1951 report and the 1954 report contained illustrative sections depicting comics that the committee found objectionable.

The cover of Startling Terror #9 is contained in Appendix A of the 1954 report. Page 16 of the report describes Appendix A as containing examples of covers “depicting sex, terror, crime and brutality”.
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Superior:Strange Mysteries Strange Mysteries 10 8.5 Strange Mysteries #10 is referenced in Fredric Wertham’s “Seduction of the Innocent” (SOTI) in the text on page 181.

Wertham believed that comic books were having a negative effect on the sexual development of children and described a story from Strange Mysteries #10 as an example of the sexual sadism children were being exposed to in comic books. He describes the story as follows “Some comic books describe sexual sadism with its most morbid psychological refinements. In a recent comic book a man makes love to a married woman, while her husband, whose leg has been injured by the lover, has to look helplessly on. The lover kisses the girl, taunting the husband all the while. The girl gets sexually so excited by this perverse situation that she exclaims: ‘Stop! I can’t stand it any more!’”

Wertham pulls his example from the story “Revenge Can Be Fatal!” While his generally description of the story is accurate, Wertham, as he is apt to do, is careless with the details. A close reading of the panel shows it is not the woman that exclaims “Stop! I can’t stand it any more!” – Rather it is her husband who asks them to stop. Please see that attached scan from the story for more details.
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Toby:Tales of Horror Tales of Horror 5 Universal 5.0 Tales of Horror #5 features 4 precode horror stories: “The Man Who Lost His Shadow”, the cover story “Hand of Fate”, “Sisters of the Witch”, and “Game of Death”. View Comic
Charlton:Thing Thing 9 5.5 The Thing! #9 is referenced in Fredric Wertham’s “Seduction of the Innocent” (SOTI) as illustration #33 with the caption “Stomping on the face is a form of brutality which modern children learn early” and in the text on page 388.

The text reference on page 388 comes in the form of a description of the story “Mardu’s Masterpiece” contained in Thing! #9. Wertham describes the story as follows “A painter ties the hands of his model to the ceiling, stabs her and uses her blood for paint. (Flowing blood is shown in six pictures.)”.

Illustration #33 comes from the story “Operation Massacre” contained in Thing! #9. In this story a scientist invents a robot that can be controlled through brain waves. He demonstrates the technology to a group of businessmen and one (Marko) decides to take the technology for himself. Marko murders the scientist and directs the robots to take over the city. Along the way, when the people resist his takeover, he lets his rage get carried away and commands the robots to destroy all humans. In an ironic twist, the robots start on him first and delivery a bit of face stomping that Wertham found offensive. I have included a scan of the page from the story that contains the face stomping in full color!\
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Charlton:Thing Thing 16 9.0 As noted by Overstreet, Thing #16 contains a classic precode horror “injury to eye” panel. The panel comes from the story “Mental Wizard”. There’s nothing like a spear to the eye to liven up a run of the mill horror story. View Comic
EC:Vault of Horror Vault of Horror 23 Universal 5.5 Vault of Horror #23 is referenced in Geoffrey Wagner’s “Parade of Pleasure” (POP) on pages 83-84.

Wagner, describing “crime-terror” comic books, uses examples from Vault of Horror #23 “To conclude this survey of almost unadulterated ghastliness, I refer to The Vault of Horror no 23, in which a woman is pursued by a Thing (‘It stand from oozing grave mud!, Clods of rancid crawling rotted flesh fell from its eyeless face…’), a man is decapitated (‘THOK!’), another boiled alive in a showerbath, and a tyrannous employer, who slaps his nine women employees, is burnt alive in his own sweatshop, the girls first flinging him under a sewing-machine and stitching up his lips in a perfectly sickening series of pictures accompanied by the text, ‘Heh, heh, heh! Well, a stich in time saves nine …’”. All these examples come from stories contained in Vault of Horror #23.
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Quality:Web of Evil Web of Evil 1 Universal 7.0 Web of Evil #1 is referenced in Fredric Wertham’s “Seduction of the Innocent” (SOTI) in the text on page 388.

On page 388, Wertham describes a comic story about Hamlet as follows “Scholars will be interested in this new version of Shakespeare’s Hamlet: THE DEATH SCENE (Hamlet Speaking): Fear not, queen mother! It was Laertes and he shall die at my hands! …Alas! I have been poisoned and now I, too, go to join my decease father! I, too – I – AGGGRRRAA!

The Hamlet reference is taken from the story “Rehearsal for Death” contained in Web of Evil #1. It tells the story of Simon Fenton, an aspiring actor, murdering his mentor Jason Worthington. Worthington returns to haunt Fenton ultimately driving him to his death as he rehearses Hamlet’s death scene.
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Gillmor:Weird Mysteries Weird Mysteries 7 5.0 Weird Mysteries #7 is referenced in Fredric Wertham’s “Seduction of the Innocent” (SOTI) as illustrations #35 and #36.

Illustration #35 contains a panel from Weird Mysteries #7 interior story “Mother’s Advice”. The panel depicts a woman in a bikini with the text “With plenty to offer…” and Wertham captions the illustration “Indeed!”.

Illustration #36 contains a panel from Weird Mysteries #7 interior story “More Deadly than the Male”. In this case, Wertham displays a panel of a woman vampire sinking her teeth into the neck of her victim and he captions the illustration “Sex and blood.”
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Harvey:Witches Tales Witches Tales 16 Universal 5.5 Witches Tales #16 contains the horror stories: “Gateway to Death”, “Revenge of a Witch”, “Midnight Limited” and “The Duel”. The cover art for the issue comes from the story “Revenge of a Witch”. View Comic
Harvey:Witches Tales Witches Tales 20 Universal 5.0 Witches Tales #20 is referenced in Fredric Wertham’s “Seduction of the Innocent” (SOTI) in the text on page 389.

On page 389, Wertham is listing murder story examples and notes the following “The stories of murder go from the simple through the gruesome to the weird. One man kills with wife with a poker, another shoots a wolf which is his wife, a third becomes transformed into a huge crab and eats her”. The example of a man killing his wife with a poker comes from the story “Shock!” contained in Witches Tales #20. In this story an old man becomes suspicious of his young wife and ultimately murders her with a poker only to find that his suspicions were misplaced.
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